0 comments on “Location Import Process Improved With Power 4.9”

Location Import Process Improved With Power 4.9

With the release of the WordPress plugins version 4.9 of Store Locator Plus and the Power add on we focused on improving the location import process for large lists.      MySLP Power users will see this release by the end of the year after it has passed full testing on our SaaS platform.

Why Did We Change The Process?

Prior to version 4.9 there were a number of limitations that could prevent larger lists of locations from importing properly.    For the fastest servers with lots of memory and super-fast networking as well as a premium tier on the Google API service, Store Locator Plus could import 40,000 locations without any problem.

As WordPress started adding more network overhead, all those update notifications and the news feed in the WordPress dashboard comes from somewhere, the network started to become an issue.   On top of that Google started tracking every single map request so they could start charging people using their maps on a per-lookup basis.     Both of these changes increased the network traffic, slowing down how quickly Store Locator Plus could get a latitude/longitude for those new locations being imported.

Often your server would give up, saying “you had your 30 seconds of my time” and stopping the import mid-stream.    The PHP time limitation on processing is often the first thing that “gives out” when importing large lists of locations.   For most shared hosts the limit is 30 seconds.   Even on a dedicated host it is good practice to not let a PHP process consume more than 120 seconds of CPU time.  This prevents “runaway” processes that take over the entire server which can grind EVERYTHING to a halt forcing a server restart.

The bad news is that if you are importing 10,000 locations and the process gives up after 9,800 locations you have to start over.   At least that is how it USED TO BE with SLP 4.8 and earlier.

How Imports Improved In Power 4.9

With version 4.8 the location import process was “tied to the browser” until it was complete.    When you clicked the “upload CSV” button your browser would sit there attached to the website while the file was uploaded, read line-by-line, each location sent to Google to get a latitude and longitude and then get added to the Store Locator Plus locations list.     If the network was slow this could take a long time, often 10 minutes or more.   That is FOREVER to keep a browser window open these days.

With Power 4.9 we split this process into 3 stages.

Stage 1 : Get The File On The server

This is the only step of the process that stays “attached to your browser”.    The browser will bar processing the page while the file is copied from your laptop to the web server.   This is typically a quick process even for a file with 250,000 locations.    The time it takes depends on how fast your local network and ISP connection is.

Previous versions stored  the uploaded location files in a “hidden” SLP-specific directory under WordPress uploads.   Version 4.9 stores them in the media library.     This gives you an easy way to see that the file was uploaded properly, see what the current import state is, and later download or delete the files when the import is complete.

Stage 2 : Import The Locations Into SLP

After the file is uploaded a detached process starts to work on the actual location import. This ensures your browser doesn’t time out as this part happens in the background.    Your browser is “free to go” while your server does the work of loading in the locations.

It runs a WP Cron job in the background to import the locations WITHOUT geocoding. This is much faster and ensures the import doesn’t disconnect partway through.

As part of improving visibility into this process, Power 4.9.1 will be out soon and will be included in our end-of-year MySLP update.  It includes a cool interactive progress bar as well showing you how many records have been read.

Power 4.9.2 Import Processing Progress
Power 4.9.2 Import Processing Progress Bar

If your server times out before our background location loader finishes reading the file , SLP remembers the last record read and re-spawns a new background job to pick up where it left off. It will do this until it reaches the end of the file no matter how often PHP times out.

Stage 3: Geocode The Locations

AFTER the file has been loaded it will then geocode all uncoded locations.   That means you may catch SLP with a list of locations none of which are geocoded and not showing up on the map.  This is a temporary state while SLP talks to Google.    Since that is always the slowest part of an import we decided to do this in a separate process so at least SOME locations start showing up right away and eventually of them are loaded.

Power 4.9.2 Geocoding Progress
Power 4.9.2 Geocoding Progress

This is similar to the import. It does it in the background and if PHP times out it will re-spawn itself until it has tried to geocode very location at least once. This is a big step toward not having an import time out. It also keeps you from manually having to re-geocode if you hit your daily 2500 location limit and didn’t opt for a paid API key.

3 comments on “Store Locator Plus and WordPress 4.9.1 Updates”

Store Locator Plus and WordPress 4.9.1 Updates

It has been a busy week for WordPress and all the updates and patches going around.    For those on our MySLP managed service, sit back and relax.  You’re good.    While you may wait a little longer for some new features and a couple of minor patches you are not going to be affected by software updates.   You’re good.

For WordPress users we’ve been busy chasing down some notable functionality issues with Store Locator Plus and the Add Ons for WordPress since WordPress 4.9 and 4.9.1 hit the update queue on your sites.

1 comment on “How To Put Google Maps On A Website”

How To Put Google Maps On A Website

You want to put Google Maps on a website but don’t know where to start. If you are not a tech geek it can be confusing. There are literally hundreds of options ranging from free to you-want-how-much? The technical skills required to implement maps on your site are no less varied, with anything from “paste this code into your web page” to “edit the JavaScript to set your JSON data block”. Depending on your budget, technical expertise, and what you need to accomplish there are a variety of options available.

Should I Go Direct To Google?

One option to consider is going direct to Google.   Why get too many people involved when you can go “straight to the source”?   It is a great option if you have the technical skills to implement the map code and the time to maintain it.

While Google is a great option, they like to change things.   Sometimes the changes are cosmetic, such as renaming a service on-a-whim with little-if-any notification.  These types of changes rarely break anything.  If you were accustomed to finding the settings you need to update under the “Browser Key” and now it is named “JavaScript Business API Key” it can be frustrating.    Less innocuous is when they change how things work such as dropping location sensor, the feature that automatically detects where the user is, if you did not enable secure web protocols when implementing your map.   Suddenly the map shows people locations in Coffeyville Kansas when they are in downtown Boston.

With a variety of third party solutions that deal with the Google changes for you, there is little reason to go directly to Google to put Google Maps on a website.

Free Google Alternatives

Google’s map service is free, at least until your site gets a lot of traffic, but it is not easy to setup unless you have technical expertise.   There are a lot of quality services and plugins available from reputable vendors.   Many of the Google Maps vendors have been around for a while and are not likely to vanish overnight.  This should alleviate any concerns that your map will suddenly disappear from your website.

Depending on which platform you are using, there are multiple free services to choose from.   For businesses that use WordPress as their website platform, our Store Locator Plus plugin is one such free option.   Maps are implemented with a shortcode and managing your locations is handled via an easy-to-use web form.   You also get the added security of owning the software.

Low-Cost Website Maps

Another way to put Google Maps on a website is to use a paid service.   If your business relies on local customers or clients, a map of your locations is paramount.   According to research by Comscore as well as many marketing agencies, business address information is the number-one item people look for when researching a local business.   With Google Maps playing such an important role, paying a little more for a mapping service is a smart investment.

Location is the most sought-after piece of information by web visitors.
Location is the most sought-after piece of information by web visitors.

…address and location are the primary pieces of information sought by local searchers.

Search Engine Land 

Paid services include a lot more than taking care of the technical challenges of putting a map on a website.   Free plugins and services do a great job of hiding the complexities of putting Google Maps on your site, however they often take care of only the basics.   Paid services add extra features and management tools so you can focus on building your business.

For example, with most free services you will still need to get “permission” from Google to show their maps on your site.   That means registering for an API key and configuring the settings of your product.  Our own Store Locator Plus for WordPress plugin works that way.   With paid services such as our My Store Locator Plus service, the API key is taken care of for you.  No extra configuration required on your part  Add your locations and paste the embed code that is generated on your site and you are done.

Software As A Service

If you choose to use a subscription-based service we recommend using a hosted or “SaaS” service.  Software-As-A-Service (SaaS) is a term for any software that you “rent” on a month-to-month basis that is managed by the company that makes the software.   If you have ever used web-based email such as gMail or Yahoo! Mail, you have used SaaS.

When it comes to putting Google Maps on a website, SaaS has many advantages.   With a service like our MySLP offering, you do not have to worry about updating the software whenever  a new update comes out.    You also don’t need to subscribe to a backup service to ensure you don’t lose your locations;  Any reputable Software-As-A-Service provider will be doing that for you.    There can also be significant performance advantages, meaning your website visitors see the map and your location faster. Most SaaS providers are running in the cloud on high-performance server with more bandwidth than most businesses get with their hosting provider.

How To Put Google Maps On A Website?

One thing is certain, if you have a local business you need to have a Google Maps on your site.   If you have multiple locations it is critical.  Which option should you choose?

  • You are technically-inclined and don’t mind spending some time every few months updating your code: going directly to Google is an option.
  • If you would like to add visual flair to your maps, want to let someone else worry about the latest changes to the Google service, and only want to focus on building your business then consider a free service.
  • Want a custom style that matches your brand, have multiple locations, rely on local traffic at your business, or want to hand-off everything but “keeping our map loaded up with the latest address information”? You’ll want to go with a SaaS-based service.

Regardless of which option you choose, studies have proven that businesses that rely on local customers generate more business by having their address and map on a website.

Have questions about how to put Google Maps on a website? We can help.