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Google Wallet versus PayPal

Google Thats An Error Banner

PayPal went offline for over an hour last night making the second time in a month and the third time in the past 2 months that the service was unavailable.   PayPal services have become increasingly unstable over the past year with numerous technical issues and down time that has impacts hundreds-of-thousands, if not millions, of users.    My business was impacted last night during one of the busiest days of the past 2 years as the long-awaited Store Locator Plus 4 release was launched yesterday morning.

Once again I set out to find a suitable replacement.    After some research into Amazon Payments, which has the same fee schedule as PayPal yet also has a “reserve” clause that holds your funds for 7-to-14 days, I opted not to use them.  Same with Elavon and their ridiculous 3.5% + $0.40 per transaction fee, a monthly processing fee, batch processing fees and another myriad of add-on fees and costs that I had completely forgotten about after leaving the hard goods retail world a decade ago.   Same for almost all “merchant services” (talk about a misnomer) credit card processors out there, charging more fees for less service.   That left only two choices on my short list:   PayPal and Google Checkout which is soon to be known as Google Wallet for Digital Goods.

As you can probably surmise by the name of the service, Google Wallet for Digital Goods will ONLY be useful for merchants that sell and ship digital goods.   If you are shipping physical goods you can stop reading now, suck it up and go with PayPal.    For those selling digital goods online or via mobile platforms you may want to keep reading.  Maybe.   As I learned along the way, the re-branding of Google Checkout to Google Wallet remains half-ass.    Clearly Google has not assigned their “A-Team” to this project and it appears to be the red-headed stepchild of the Google Business offerings.    As such I decided, like those with physical goods online stores, to just “suck it up” and stick with PayPal and all the warts that come with it.     Yes, PayPal rates are higher than Google’s rates.  Yes, PayPal SUCKS at helping merchants fight fraudulent chargebacks and actually turns a profit processing those chargebacks.    But PayPal clearly thinks of merchant services as their primary business and not a “give these college kids something to work on”-back-room project like Google does.    Pretty harsh review about Google Wallet for Business, I agree, but I also feel it is warranted.

Google Wallet Search
The Google Wallet Search Form – looks pretty. You’d think Google, of all people, would have this working.
Google Wallet Search Fail
What happens when you use search on the Google Wallet pages.

I’ve checked out Google merchant services many times in the past.   Despite some cleaned up modern graphics to help sell the service on the front-end, the back-end is a virtually unchanged hack job of an interface.   Not only is the interface very pedestrian, it is rife with links to outdated help documents, is completely lacking the tools any serious online business needs to research and report on their sales, and is over-simplified to the point of being utterly useless for any real accounting such as import and processing transactions in QuickBooks.    It is no wonder the Google Checkout service failed to ever gain ground against PayPal or the relatively-new-to-market Amazon Payments services.

The Fee Schedule

As with any merchant service one of the first things I look at is processing fees.    Many credit card processors, places like Elavon and Authorize.net, eat you alive  in processing fees.   10-cents here, a quarter-there.  Before you know it you’ve shelled out $900 for $10,000 worth of sales.     It is death by a million paper cuts.    It was true 15 years ago and is true today, traditional credit card processing companies suck at dealing with new-economy merchants.    On the other hand, places like PayPal, Amazon Payments, and Google Wallet for Digital Goods are all tooled specifically to help new economy merchants and have fee structures that are friendly to small businesses.    As such, the first stop at Google Wallet is the fee schedule.

At Google Wallet you will find a very simple web page that states the fees are the LOWER of 5% of the sale OR 1.9% + $0.30.    For anything that is selling at $10 or more the rate is 1.9% + $0.30 regardless of volume.    Both PayPal and Amazon Payments require merchants to sell $100,000 PER MONTH before you qualify for that rate.    If you sell $100k PER YEAR this lowers the fees you pay to the merchant processor by $600 when compared to PayPal.

However, when you sign up for the Google Wallet for Digital Goods service you are required to agree to the Terms of Service agreement.   Within that document they have a myriad of links to various addendum pages including the Rate Schedule (list of fees).   That link goes to an old Google Checkout transaction processing fees page that states the fees are IDENTICAL to the Amazon Payments/PayPal structure with one critical exception; Google charges 1% more per transaction if the buyer and seller are in different countries.  So much for competitive rates.

Google Checkout Fees
The now defunct, maybe-who-knows, Google Checkout fee schedule as linked in the Google Wallet Terms of Service.

Customer Service

When I discovered the discrepancy in published fees I decided I better get an answer to which fee schedule is the REAL schedule.   If it is the original 1.9% deal then making a switch may be worth the effort.   If, on the other hand, it is the tiered schedule that starts at 2.9% AND has a 1% “different country” penalty the switch would be a bad decision as I would lose money in fees AND a week of productivity would be lost during the transition.   Thus I wrote Google an email via the customer support link at Google Wallet.

Kudos to Google Customer Service, they did respond quickly and gave me an example of a $9.67 transaction and a table that was cut from the web page I already read that states the fee as 1.9% plus $0.30.    However they completely ignored the fact that the Terms of Service were wrong.    Nor do I think that if this guy pulled up the WRONG information that Google would stand behind the rate schedule some customer support dude sent me via email.  I can already see Google’s response when my first 3.9% processing fee for an order from the UK comes in… “Sorry Mr. Cleveland, the rate IS 3.9%, the customer service dude gave you bad information.  You did read and agree to the Terms of Service, didn’t you?”.     Customer Service also completely skirted the “buyer and seller in a different country” portion of my question and whether or not the 1% add-on fee applies.   Though he did avoid answering the question in a very subtle ways saying, just before his $9.67 example “for transactions in the US”.    If my read-between-the-lines skill are what I think they are then his answer was “yeah man, we’re gonna nail you for an extra 1% for selling anything to those dang non-Americans” which is EXACTLY what I don’t want as I try to expand my sales into an international customer base.

Cut and Paste Answers
Google Customer Service cut-and-paste answers.

A Collection of Fail

I’m not sure why Google even has the Google Wallet for Business / Google Wallet for Digital Goods / Google Checkout That Is Almost Dead service online in its current state.   How do they expect anyone to have any confidence that their transactions will be processed properly when Google, king of the World of Internet Searches, cannot even build a half-functional website.    It doesn’t bode well for the service if the production manager on this site doesn’t take the time to hire one of their bazillion interns to try to surf the site and make sure it works.   Fixing basic things like broken links or non-conflicting information would be nice.

Broken Help Links
Google’s inline help links are not very helpful. Did anyone at Google even try to use this site?

Final Decision

Final decision?  Not really.  These kind of services change frequently and if Google ever decides to stop putting merchant services in the back room and “letting the kids play with it” I think they can be competitor.  Especially as it is tied to their prolific mobile platforms payment engine that handles all of those android app sales.    However someone needs to be put in charge for the non-app-store side of that business and try to actually compete with PayPal.  Until they do so Google Checkout will continue to be a second-rate service that does not instil enough confidence in business owners such as my self to start putting all their online sales into the “Google Wallet Basket”.

Maybe next time around I’ll choose Google. For now I’ve decided to keep dating the wart-nosed older sister with more experience and stability than the younger less-refined and very schizophrenic cheaper date.   That old girl may trip over her walker and make us late to our next dinner date, but at least I know she’ll be there.  Warts and all.   As for that younger sister, maybe she’ll grow up some day.

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PayPal Is Currently Down

PayPal Down

PayPal is currently down with no ETA on when the service will be back. Since PayPal is currently the only payment service I use at the Charleston Software Associates site that means no orders, which means no way for users to order the Store Locator Plus 4 upgrades or add-on packs.

Nice going PayPal.

I will look into alternatives, but by the time I get something wired in PayPal will likely be back online. I also do not want to create a nightmare for my accountant that keeps my QuickBooks stuff straight. However this is the second time in a month that PayPal has impacted the user experience on my site and that is NOT acceptable. Combined with ridiculous chargeback fees I think it is time to locate a new payment provider.

 

PayPal Down Oct 7 2013
PayPal Down Oct 7 2013
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Bruce Bedrick : Kind Clinics on Wall of Shame

Chargeback Kind Clinics

Yet another customer had their credit card stolen or their PayPal account hacked.    The amazing part is how many of these identity thieves not only steal their credit card information but also hack into the person’s website.   Then they go so far as to do the most diabolical thing ever!    No, not grab their customer list.  No, not insert redirect links to cheap nike shoes.   No.  Far worse.   They INSTALL MY SOFTWARE on the site.   These thieves are ruthless.

Trust me, I really want to catch these guys.    Every time they do this sort of thing PayPal sends me a customer initiated chargeback message like this one:

Hello Lance Cleveland,

We were recently notified that one of your buyers filed a chargeback and
asked the credit card issuer to reverse a payment made to you on Jun 10,
2013.

The buyer claims that this purchase was made without authorization to use
the credit card. Their credit card issuer needs additional information from
you about this transaction.

———————————–
Transaction Details
———————————–
Buyer’s Name: Bruce Bedrick
Buyer’s Email: drbruce@kindclinics.com
Buyer’s Transaction ID: 2NT293502W259540N
Transaction Date: Jun 10, 2013
Transaction Amount: -$230.00 USD
Invoice ID: WC-10870
Case #: PP-002-432-640-244
Your Transaction ID: 2G720304L9657970L

———————————–
What to Do Next
———————————–

Please respond within 10 days so that we can help resolve this chargeback.
To respond, log in to your PayPal account and go to the Resolution Center
to provide information about this transaction.

The credit card issuer decides if the buyer’s claim is legitimate. Once the
credit card issuer receives your information, it may take up to 75 days to
make a final decision.

Because the credit card issuer has reversed the charge for this
transaction, we’ve placed a temporary hold on the funds associated with
this transaction until the case is resolved. Our user agreement explains
our policies on holding funds.

You can learn more about chargebacks in the Resolution Center tutorials.

———————————–
Other Details
———————————–
There are no other details regarding this transaction at the moment.

Sincerely,
PayPal
Chargeback Department
CB:PP-002-432-640-244:USD230.00:6/21/2013:2G720304L9657970L
PPID PP767

Big deal, right? Well, sort of. Not only do I have to burn 15 minutes responding to PayPal so they don’t close my account, at the end of it all the poor victim (Dr. Bruce Bedrick in this case) gets his money back and I end up not only with nothing for the sale but also an additional $50 in fees assessed by PayPal and the credit card company for letting identity thieves buy something from me.  Wonderful, isn’t it.    The best part is PayPal and the credit card company actually make a PROFIT in this transaction.  No wonder they don’t really give a damn that this happens so frequently.

Kind Clinics

Here is Bruce’s website at KindClinics.com along with the installed hacked software:

Kind Clinics Bruce Bedrick
Kind Clinics Bruce Bedrick
Kind Clinics Website
Kind Clinics website with find locations feature.
Kinds Clinics Store Locator Plus
Kinds Clinics Store Locator Plus
Kinds Clinics Store Pages
Kinds Clinics Store Pages
Kind Clinics Enhanced Maps
Kind Clinics Enhanced Maps
Kind Clinics Enhanced Results
Kind Clinics Enhanced Results
Kind Clinics Enhanced Search
Kind Clinics Enhanced Search

 

Kind Clinics Tagalong
Kind Clinics Tagalong

 

Kind Clinics Pro Pack
Kind Clinics Pro Pack

The Victim : Bruce Bedrick

Poor Bruce Bedrick.  I really feel bad for him and his stolen credit card.   I’m posting the information the identity thieves used during the transaction here so you can track him down and let him know I care.

Address:
Bruce Bedrick
Medbox
7047 E Greenway Parkway
Scottsdale, Arizona 85254

Email: drbruce@kindclinics.com

Phone: 800-762-1452

Customer IP: 98.167.201.90

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Wall of Shame : Point Immatriculation, Saisson France

Sadly I have another addition to make to my customer “Wall of Shame”.

Newest Wall of Shame Addition

Point Immatriculation

Marteau claims that their PayPal account, which is still active, was used fraudulently and that the purchases they made at CSA were not authorized.

Interesting that they claim fraud yet their site is using Store Locator Plus.

Guess the thief that stole their card also hacked their website and installed the Store Locator Plus application!

Wonder how this got on their live site if the charge was unauthorized?

http://www.cartegrise-pointimmatriculation.fr/wp-content/plugins/store-locator-le/readme.txt

http://www.cartegrise-pointimmatriculation.fr/wp-content/plugins/slp-enhanced-results/readme.txt

http://www.cartegrise-pointimmatriculation.fr/wp-content/plugins/slp-pages/readme.txt

Contact:

Point Immatriculation
Marteau Jacques-Antoine
6 rue du beffroi
02200 SOISSONS
France

Email: jacquesantoinevia@gmail.com

Phone: 0323727272

http://www.cartegrise-pointimmatriculation.fr/ou-faire-carte-grise/

Prior Wall of Shame Inductees

Honfeng Dong (iphonex@hotmail.co.uk)

iPhonex claims their credit card was stolen and this charge was not authorized.   Their $15 purchase for MoneyPress : eBay Pro Pack will now cost CSA more than $23.   Was this user too lazy to contact us and request a refund?  Or didn’t want to go to PayPal and start a charge dispute?  Or was the card truly stolen and this is a fraudulent credit card charge?  Who knows.   Send then an email and find out!

Ryan (Mark) Chesney (chesneyryan@gmail.com)

Mark decided that the best route for getting a refund on a product that was purchased 3 months ago was to issue a chargeback through his credit card company rather than contacting me directly.    Nice move, now he gets his refund and his “purchase” costs me an additional $22.   What a tool.

Want to ask Ryan what he’s thinking?  You can reach him at:

Attn: Ryan Chesney
K2S
516 W 860 N
American Fork, UT 84003
USA
(801) 369-3635

Stacy Kaufman

Stacy claims that the purchase she made here is an unauthorized charge, yet her PayPal account remains open and active.  Odd, why would PayPal keep an account open and active when someone claims the account has been compromised?   I can’t quite figure that one out.

Oddly, Stacy is using the full version of Store Locator Plus on the Pure Brazilian website.   Kind of retarded that people don’t know you can actually VERIFY use of the product on a live website.   Not only is Stacy using the product but using a version that was just published a few weeks ago.

You can get in touch with Stacy here:

Email: purebrazilianhair@gmail.com

Tel: 9542171980

Billing address

Stacy Kaufman
Pure Brazilian
905 Shotgun Road
Sunrise, Florida 33326

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How To Be Unproductive Doing 8 Hours of Coding

Today was just one of those days.   You know, THAT day.   When you wake up early, get online and think “this is going to be a good, productive day”.   Then all hell breaks loose.   8 hours later you’ve found yourself coding and doing system work all day long and have NOTHING to show for it.   That was my kind of day today.   What broke & what I learned so you may possibly avoid the same issues or at least spend less time fixing them.

Woocommerce 2.0

Ouch.  The new UI is nice.  They fixed some bugs.  They patched some security holes.   They didn’t document a DAMN THING when it comes to all the modifications in the core engine.  You know, little stuff like how their hooks and filters were changed.  The stuff that many third party Woocommerce add-on packs, their own add-on packs, and my custom PayPal tracking and licensing system utilize.    That made for another long day after spending 4 hours reading their code to learn what they changed and patching those items yesterday.   I don’t know how many other Woocommerce items broke yesterday, but I’m guessing it was more than just mine.

Today the PayPal IPN listener was not working.   Turns out they completely removed the original AJAX listener that was, and still is, documented on their site as “how to get your custom PayPal buttons to record transactions in Woocommerce”.   Thus, anyone that purchased the Pro Pack from within the plugin would not get recorded.  No sale.  No license.  No fun.

Some of the hooks and filters that impacted me were the way the WC_Order methods are written, how to fetch an order from a PayPal transaction, and other niceties.   If you have a custom processor for WooCommerce and PayPal and have issues, contact me at this site and I can share some of my hacks.

After HOURS of digging I finally discovered that I had to change my PayPal IPN settings for the new Woocommerce “feature”.   Thanks Woo team for letting all of us IPN users know.   Making the change was easy enough after reading code for 3 hours to learn what the heck they broke in Woocommerce, but…

PayPal IPN

PayPal, in typical fashion, has done half-a-job in making things work.  Once I discovered what I needed to change to get the IPN working with Woocommerce I went and updated my IPN address in PayPal.   Well, in a wonderfully useful moment of forward-thinking by the PayPal dev team, I learned that if you change the IPN service address TODAY then any transactions posted before TODAY will not use the new address.

OK, I guess I get that, but here is the fun part.   I have several transactions from this morning that were sent to the wrong location.   So I just change the setting to the new location, find the transaction, and click the “resend IPN transaction to your server” button.  That should do it, right?  WRONG.   They never read the updated URL.   Thus there is NO WAY to get those few wrong transactions to be put through to my server and “do the magic”.    What a PITA.     Because of this one simple issue I then spent another hour hacking Woocommerce so I could fake an IPN transaction without leaving a huge gaping security hole in my site.

Thanks PayPal.

Oh… and for the record, your PayPal IPN needs to be like this:

http://<your site>/?wc-api=WC_Gateway_Paypal

NOT the old-school /?paypalListener=paypal_standard_IPN setting.

However, not to be outdone, Microsoft decided to get in on the act.

Azure Code-word For…

I finally figured out why Microsoft named their new cloud service Azure.    At first I thought it was some clever reference to the sky… you know, clouds are in the sky, the sky is blue, but Amex kinda took that word and marketed the crap out of it… so clever Microsoft came up with Azure.  How cute.   But then I figured out what it really means…

Servers are shutdown out of the clear azure… I mean blue…

Yup, that’s right.    Here I was logged in to the middle of a log tracking session as a priv’ed user and suddenly out of nowhere I get a “Server being shut down for POWER OFF. Now.”.   WTF?!?!?    Yeah, that’s right.   Microsoft decided to just shut down my server.     I can’t get any answers from them as to what might have happened, how to look for potential issues, NOTHING.  Not a word.

Thinking “there must be a plausible explanation for this” I spent another few hours scanning my server logs.    Security breach?  Nope.  At least none that are recorded in ANY of the log files.      Rogue shutdown command?  Nope.   Hardware fault on the virtualized “metal”?  Nope.     After looking at Unix & Linux system log files over the past 25 years it sure as hell looks like someone just plain hit the reset or power-off button on the hardware.  For a virtual machine that simply means some dill-hole at Microsoft clicked the “power off” button on the wrong server in the host manager interface.   No warning.  No “let me check and make sure this is the right server”.  Nothing.

Maybe Microsoft can prove me wrong and show me a memory fault, security breach, or some other internal-based explanation of how my server just shut down but I’ll be damned if I can find it.

I’m going to hold my breath until Microsoft responds.

Now that I think of it, maybe that is where they came up with the name Azure…. I’m already starting to feel a bit dizzy… think I’m turning Azure….

Quality of Service

I didn’t even touch on the complete suckitude of a system that Microsoft-owned Expedia produced that I got to deal with in between.  When I get the occasional email from a Store Locator Plus customer saying things like “I can’t believe you can’t do X” or “how could you release a product with Y not working?” I always think of the “awesome quality” that everyone else can produce but I cannot.  Yeah, I’m being sarcastic here.    Today I got to deal with anything-but-perfect services that multi-million dollar corporations with big dev teams, QA teams, and a plethora of available beta testing users available and still have problems.

I guess for a solo act I’m not doing so badly.

At least today was not COMPLETELY wasted.   I did happen to stumble across a few-dozen douchebag hackers from India, China, and Russia that have been trying to brute force my server.  None got in, but it did remind me I need to get better security on my new server.    That is content for another article.    Maybe after I get some actual code written for Tagalong.  At this rate I’ll be lucky to get that done before WordCamp Atlanta next week.

 

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Chargebacks? PayPal Can Leave You Holding The Bag

For years we’ve been using PayPal as our preferred payment services provider.  We’ve recommended their services to hundreds of clients since we first started conducting online transactions as far back as 2001.   In all those years and over thousands of transactions we had always found PayPal fees and service charges to fair.   However in the past few years PayPal has become increasingly aggressive in their fee structures and has become more and more like a typical old-school merchant services provider.

When PayPal was young and competitive they were just as concerned with assisting their vendors and service providers as handling transactions and collecting fees.   Today PayPal has continued tweaking their fee schedules and add-on costs to the point of being a non-competitive alternative to the established providers.   They have also learned more than a few of the bad habits of the larger banking institutions.

Recently it came to our attention that PayPal no longer offers any form of seller protection for digital merchants.  If you are selling electronic digital goods, such as an eBook or a WordPress plugin by some chance, you are 100% liable for any fees associated with the fraud that some consumers engage in.   But here is the real gotcha when dealing with PayPal, if for any reason your “customer” files a chargeback with their credit card company you are not only 100% liable for the original transaction, which PayPal will automatically remove from your account but you also get hit with a $20 Chargeback Fee which cannot be contested.

That means that for every single transaction you conduct you have a potential of $20.35 negative revenue if the customer complains to their credit card company instead of directly to PayPal.   The chargeback can be initiated for ANY REASON.

A Perfect Example

In our case a customer, we’ll use the name David Cutting (since that was his name), purchased our Store Locator Plus WordPress plugin for $25.00.   Rather than communicate with us, or with PayPal, the customer notified their credit card company that they did not make the purchase and that it was an unauthorized charge.

PayPal’s immediate response was to issue a an unresolved complaint via the Resolution Center.   It simply said “customer did not authorize purchase, under investigation”.  We immediately refunded the $25.00 to the customer, but PayPal did NOT close the case.  Instead is remained open for nearly 45 days.    Then it hit.     In addition to the $25.00 removed from our account (plus the $0.35 PayPal transaction fee that you never get back), PayPal charged us an additional $20 chargeback fee.

That simple $25 product we sold ended up netting us NEGATIVE $20 because the customer complained to their credit card company.

Even more interesting is that PayPal refused to close out the account.  In fact if you request funds from the user you do not receive a notice that the account is closed, which is odd since the user claims it is being used fraudulently.

PayPal Response

We did, in fact, call PayPal Merchant Services to inquire as to how to protect ourselves in the future.   At 4:55PM EST on 12/29/2011 we spoke with a friendly but unhelpful customer service agent.   We were told some interesting things about this situation:

Merchants that sell digital goods have no proof of delivery and therefore are not covered under the Seller Protection Policy.

Anyone can perform a chargeback through their credit card company.  We cannot do anything about it, it is just a cost of doing businesses.

… the credit card company charges us OVER $100 per chargeback, we are only charging you a small portion of that fee.

Some of the statements that were made are downright laughable.  $100 per chargeback?  Really?  With who?  If that is the case then PayPal is horribly mismanaged and needs to find a new CFO.     We were also told things like “we realize PayPal is not a good fit for everybody” and that the “PayPal fraud filters do not catch 100% of fraudulent transactions” which is why we are liable as merchants.

Alternatives

Are there viable alternatives to PayPal?  These days?  Yes, plenty.    Google Checkout has similar services at lower rates for and better discount tiers.  They also have a maximum $10 chargeback fee (versus $20 at PayPal) and do offer recourse for digital goods merchants.   Also the online payment technologies of many major merchant service providers are at least as sophisticated as the PayPal online payment systems, in fact many far exceed the features and capabilities of PayPal.   Going direct to a merchant service provider can also reduce the rates charged for transactions to nearly HALF of PayPal’s 2.5% rate and they offer much better chargeback protection.

Will we be changing our payment system?  Maybe.   I’d change it today if it wasn’t so ingrained into our product line and licensing system.  The fact of the matter is it will be very costly to replace PayPal with another provider, but a couple of more chargebacks and it will quickly change the equation.

One thing is for certain, we will no longer be recommending PayPal as the only payment services option to our clients.  Google Checkout, Authorize.Net and several other payment systems will be given equal billing and possibly be favored simply by publishing the full payment fees and discount rates offered by each service.

Software Piracy

Installing and KEEPING the software on your servers after a refund or chargeback is considered software piracy.    By keeping the software installed on a server the business can be held liable under civil and criminal law.   Monetary damages can be requested including not only actual damages, which is the current purchase price of the software plus incurred chargeback fees, but also statutory damages of $150,000 for each program that is installed.    In addition the US government can criminally prosecute for copyright infringement which includes fines of up to $250,000 and 5 years of jail time.    Your business is accountable for software installed on your servers even if you have outsourced your information technology to a consultant or service provider.

Wall of Shame

Customer Chargebacks

Honfeng Dong (iphonex@hotmail.co.uk)

iPhonex claims their credit card was stolen and this charge was not authorized.   Their $15 purchase for MoneyPress : eBay Pro Pack will now cost CSA more than $23.   Was this user too lazy to contact us and request a refund?  Or didn’t want to go to PayPal and start a charge dispute?  Or was the card truly stolen and this is a fraudulent credit card charge?  Who knows.   Send then an email and find out!

Marteau Jacques-Antoine (jacquesantoinevia@gmail.com)

Marteau claims that their PayPal account, which is still active, was used fraudulently and that the purchases they made at CSA were not authorized.

Point Immatriculation
Marteau Jacques-Antoine
6 rue du beffroi
02200 SOISSONS
France

Email: jacquesantoinevia@gmail.com

Phone: 0323727272

Interesting that they claim fraud yet their site is using Store Locator Plus.   Guess the thief that stole their card also hacked their website and installed the Store Locator Plus application!  http://www.cartegrise-pointimmatriculation.fr/ou-faire-carte-grise/

Ryan (Mark) Chesney (chesneyryan@gmail.com)

Mark decided that the best route for getting a refund on a product that was purchased 3 months ago was to issue a chargeback through his credit card company rather than contacting me directly.    Nice move, now he gets his refund and his “purchase” costs me an additional $22.   What a tool.

Want to ask Ryan what he’s thinking?  You can reach him at:

Attn: Ryan Chesney
K2S
516 W 860 N
American Fork, UT 84003
USA
(801) 369-3635

Stacy Kaufman

Stacy claims that the purchase she made here is an unauthorized charge, yet her PayPal account remains open and active.  Odd, why would PayPal keep an account open and active when someone claims the account has been compromised?   I can’t quite figure that one out.

Oddly, Stacy is using the full version of Store Locator Plus on the Pure Brazilian website.   Kind of retarded that people don’t know you can actually VERIFY use of the product on a live website.   Not only is Stacy using the product but using a version that was just published a few weeks ago.

You can get in touch with Stacy here:

Email: purebrazilianhair@gmail.com

Tel: 9542171980

Billing address

Stacy Kaufman
Pure Brazilian
905 Shotgun Road
Sunrise, Florida 33326